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Full text of "Plus Exchange - Issue 1 (1985-06)(TriMicro)(US)"

TRI 




MICRO 



NO. 1, June 1985 




CONTRARY TO POPULAR OPINION: YOU ARE NOT A COMPUTER ORPHAN 

Join the PLUS EXCHANGE Users Group 



Qua! if icat ions for Adopt jLon : 



interest in 



software on any computer, with particular emphasis on the 
Plus 4. ! 



Tri Micro integrated 

Commodore 



Th is news lett er 



is not 
information 



is the first issue of a monthly publication to be 
of the; PLUS EXCHANGE Users Group. Integrated 
like other software. People begin to manipulate 
in different ways and beccme creative in 
uses which derive frcm the capabilities of integration 
rather than from the capabilities of any one single application. In 
the newsletter we plan t<b explore these uses, recounting both our 
own experiences and those Which you share with us. 



sent to member s 

software 

their 

developing 



Questions regarding specific problems should be sent to 
newsletter desk. You can ibe assured of an answer. 



the 



Expecially for PLUS 4 owners, tne PLUS EXCHANGE will provide an 

avenue for obtaining infortotion, software, and support. Tri Micro, 

Commodore, and other software titles will be available at a 
discount. We have had many requests for a programmer's reference 

guide. With the publication of next issue, if we receive sufficient 

, one will be offered, 
international 




In our efforts supporting the 



Plus 



4 in 



markets, 



Tri Micro is in a unique position to 
import software developed for the computer in other countries where 
the Plus 4 has received 4 .better reception. In addition, those of 
you with Plus 4 programs aijre invited to submit them for publication. 
They will be added to the £>LUS EXCHANGE software list and you will 

smal 1 r oya 1 t y : each 



r ece 1 ve 
program 



time another member purchases a 



Charter Member 



$40/yr, payable $10.00/quarter 



Up to 50% discounts ovx software. 
Savings pays your nontjjer ship . 




Regular Member 



$20/yr, payable $5 . 00/quarter 






Both memberships include newsletter, phone support, 
tutorials, free upgrades to software. You can change 
frcm one type of membership to the other at any time on 
a pro-rata basis. j 




WORD PROCESSING TIPS 



the first paragraph of this column 
as an example: 





Although the documentation for dif- 

versions of Tri Micro inte- 
software is corplete in its 
explanation, a few practical appli- 
cations of the program features 
become apparent only with repeatea 
use. Working with the several 
versions on a daily basis, I have 
developed a checklist of certain 

hints and shortcuts. This first 
column will discuss the word 
processing portion of the software. 



Pointers 



cne 



setting. 



One rather distracting feature of 
software is the pointer 
Unless a pointer is set at the end of 
each paragraph, all text below the 
paragraph will be moved during an 
insert or delete. There are several 
solutions to this dilemma. The first 
is to remember to set a pointer at 
the end of each paragraph, just 
before you press the RETURN Key. 
This method is much more convenient 
than naving to set pointers after you 
have prepared your entire file. 



I had also noticed that sometimes 
pointers were automatically activated 
after a search and replace routine 
was performed. After completing trie 
search and replace, I would continue* 

to type the rest of my text, to find 
that pointers now accompanied the 
text to the appropriate end of 
paragraph line. Questioning David 

Johnson, the programmer, to determine 
the cause of ''auto-pointers" (as I 
came to refer to them) , we isolated 
the event which caused this "auto- 
pointer 



• y 



If the search and replace forced a 
carriage return, thereby forcing rhe 
movement of the pointer set by the 
search and replace routine, the 
' 'auto-pointer ' " became active . 

Therefore, if I did not want to set 
my pointers manually while typing my 
text, I would sinply execute a search 
and replace on the first paragraph 
which forced a carriage return line 
change. This would activate the 



• y 



auto -pointer 



/ v 



For example, using 



/ V 



Lching the point where I typed 
portion of", you would know 
that you were nearing the end of 
the line (indicated by the 
column counter). Therefore, 
position the cursor before 

' 'portion ' ' , enter command mode 
and type RE for search 
replace. Replace ' 'portion of 
with ' 'portion of the soft 
ware. ' ' A new line has bee 
forced. New as you type th 
remaining paragraphs, 
oointer will automatically be 



and 



• ^ 




set at the end of a block of 

text. 



S f 



If you choose to activate the auto 

note that the pointer 



• • 



po inter 

follows the carriage return symbol . 
Therefore, you may sometimes have a 
single line of text where a pointer 
is set. This will be true if a 
carriage return is the end of the 
line. The auto- pointer will affect 
the insert and delete function if a 
carriage return is mistakenly left in 
the middle of a line. You will not 
be able to delete text from one line 
into a line having a pointer, nor 
will you be able to insert past a 
pointer. If you are having these 
problems after setting the auto- 
pointer, be sure and check the line 
on which the pointer keeps appearing. 
If this line lias a carri 




return , 

remove the carriage return, and the 
insert/delete function will operate 
unimpaired. 



Moving Text Without 
Insert and Delete 




The word processor lias a 
function which is also useful in 
moving lines or parts of lines 



around. 



This function is activated 



with the Ccmmodore Logo key (0=) and 
the key bearing the symbol I. If you 
position the cursor anywhere in your 
text and press RETURN, the text 
immediately following the cursor on 
that line will be truncated* To 
restore truncated text, position the 

cursor where you want the text to be 
inserted and press the Logo key (C=) 
and the I key together. 



Let us say, or example, that 
the following text: 



This is an example of moving 
text using the restore function. 
To activate this function, 
press Logo (G=) and the I key. 

To add a phrase between the first anc. 
the second sentence without openinr 
space using the insert/delete key, 
position the cursor over the ' 'T" in 
' 'To activate . . . " . Move to the 
second line, and use the insert line 



carmand to insert a 



lank 



line. 
"The 



Begin typing the phrase , 

restore function restores text which 



s s 



has been erased by tne RETURN key. 
Use the space bar to move over two 

Press the 0= and the @ 




Keys 



toge ther . 

follows: 



The phrase will appear as 



This is an example of moving 
text using the restore function. 



The restore function 



restores 



text which has been erased by 
the RETURN key. To activate 

this function, press Logo (O) 
and the I key. 

In this instance using the restore 
function to insert and move text was 
significantly faster than multiple 
inserts and deletes. Remember that 



be 



truncated, 



only one line may 
therefore, you can only reposition a 
maximum of one line at a time using 
the restore function. Sometimes, a 
combination of both restore and 

and delete is the most 





efficient. Although the 
feature is not always the answer, in 
seme instances, it can be quite 
helpful. 

Another way in which to move or 

replace phrases without using the 

insert and delete keys is to use the 

carmand . The 




will 




search and replace 

and replace command 
existing text with up to 29 
characters. Remember also that blank 
spaces are recognized as significant 
char ac te r s . There fore , 
characters can be replaced 
blanks as well as text. 



existing 
with 



For instance, let's change "This is 



* 

an example of moving text using the 
restore function. ' ' The way in which 

" The 

of 



we want the copy to read is 



/ • 



lowing provides an 



:ample 




* * 



us ing the re s tor e 
'n command activate the 



moving 
function 

search and replace. In response to 
the SEARCH prompt, type in "This is 
an". In response to the BECOMES 
prompt, type in "The following 
provides an". You have changed a 
phrase in the text without using the 
insert key repetitively. 



* • 



To see how the blank spaces work, 
change the phrase again. SEARCH 
The following provides", and hit 
RETURN in response to the prompt 
BECOMES. The phrase now reads ' 'an 
example of moving text using the 
restore function. " Type a capital 
'A' over the lower case 'a' in 

' function' ' , and 



f • 



f * 




f S 



f f 



f * 



The phrase new 
An example of moving text 



an . -ujruw^i lui^lxuh , 

answer the prompt BECOMES with 

function follows 

read s , 

using the restore function follows.'' 

This sentence has been edited twice 

without having to use the insert or 

function to count out the 




spaces required by the editing. 



Out of Space? 

Since the computer memory must hold 
multiple applications and data files 
simultaneously in memory, each 
individual word processing file is 
limited to 9 9 lines. You can use the 
linkfile command to create longer 
documents. Some tunes, however, when 

are editing a document 



you 



you 



realize that you need to insert text 
in a file which is already 99 lines 

long. 

Remember that up to sixteen lines of 
text may be defined as a block to be 
used with the delete and insert 



buffer command. 



s 



Deleting the last 
of a file or a block 




sixteen line 

anywhere in the file will open 

for insertions in the previously full 

file. After making your insertions, 

re-save the file. Now, clear manor y 

to begin a new file. The block you 

previously deleted is still in the 

buffer memory. To restore it to its 

position, type the insert block (ib) 

command. The deleted block, will 



appear as the start of a new file. 



You can also insert this 



block 



anywhere you desire in other files. 
In other words , if you want to type a 
few paragraphs in the new file and 
then insert the previously deleted 
block, you may. The block of text in 
the buffer memory stays in the 
buffer until you have defined a new- 
block of text using the copy block or 
delete block commands. 



If 



you 
lines, use 



need to delete more than 16 



the delete block command 



to break the file into smaller parts. 



You 



then rename the 



can 
file and the new file. 
use the 
very 
that 



original 

You can also 
file command to move 



merge 
large blocks of text. 
the merpe file command appends 



Remember 



*. i~ 



to the bottom of 
Therefore, a 

16 line 



■J-ovf- 



b lock 



exist ma texu 
of text lonaer 
than lb lines can be saved under a 
file name (such as 'temp'). When you 
reach the point in vour tyoina where 
you would like to insert this block, 
type a merge file command and the 
file 'temp' will be appended to vour 
file. Then continue typing until you 
have completed your file. 



Repetitive phrases and descriptions 
( "boiler plates' ') 



use of the 



merge 



are also a good 
file function. 



Using 



the 



block movement and merge 

file commands make it much easier to 

prepare longer documents despite the 
99-line file length limitation. 



COMING NEXT ISSUE 



nave 



any 



of 



deve loped 



you aeveiopea any 

short-cuts or tips you might like to 
share with the rest of us? If 



please mail a description to 



so, 
us? 

NEXT COLUMN: USING THE FILE MANAGER, 

IOTEGRATION 



INDEXING RECORDS, USING 

TO DERIVE MORE POWER FROM 

REPORTING, EASY LABEL FORMATTING. 



YOUR 



Also: CONVERTING BASIC C-64 to PLUS 

4, Program Listing for Alphabetizing 
your Disk Directories. 



1 4072 Srrarron Way 

Santa Ana, CA 92705 

(714)802-6707 






/ 



PLUS 4 WORKSHOP 



Gr aphi cs 
machine 





Activate the 



monitor 



language 

graphics picture. 

the 




Draw a 



araw mg a 
screen utilizing 

character set of the keys. 

monitor to leave 4 blank lines at the 



graphics 
Use -the 



bottom of the graphics screen 
save the file with the S 



and 



* * 



command. 



Decimal to Hex Conversion: You can 

use the built-in monitor to aid in 

conversion. Poke a decimal number 
into a specific location. Use the 

built-in monitor to look at the hex 
value at that location. You may also 
reverse the process for hex to 
decimal conversion. 



V -J 



(\ 



U 



) l : 



n 



LJ'-'J 



REM CIRCLES 

WAIT2:CLR 
OX=100:OY=30 

XR~10:REM RADIUS X 
!/ 1 = 1 2: REM RADIUS Y 



:REM CENTER 



LU 50 SA==0:REM START OF ARC 

106 SA=180:REM END OF ARC 

10 70 A=0:REM ROTATION 

108 IC=2:REM DEGREE INC 

1090 FORI=lTO50 

1100 GOSUB1120:GOSUB1140 

1110 NEXTIrEND 

1120 

1130 

1140 

1150 



XR-XR+ 2 : YR=YR+ 2 : EA=E A+ 5 : OY=0 Y+ ! 
RETURN 

DEF l,OX,OY,XR,YR,SA,EA,A,IC 



i > t, ■ nT 



URN 




116 REM 

117 REM PART OF THE FUN OF HAVING 
1180 A PLUS/4 IS SEEING AND 

119 AND EXPERIENCING ITS 
1200 GRAPHICS ABILITY 

1210 REM 

1220 ABOVE IS A CONIC CIRCLE 
123 REM GENERATOR LISTING 
12 40 REM TRY TYPING IT IN AND 
125 REM SEE WHAT HAPPENS! 
1260 REM DAVID W. JOHNSON 
127 REM GOOD LUCK FOR NOW 



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MICRO